Archive for the ‘Interesting Random Stuff’ Category

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It may not be optimal to its business model, but Facebook needs to acknowledge it is now a primary source for news, and it does bear a journalistic responsibility. Otherwise we will continue to see hatred and misinformation skyrocket. Facebook has an even greater responsibility to be consistent with its brand. The whole design is premised on verifiable and trustworthy content. There are plenty of gray areas where Facebook can stay out. But there are also plenty of black and white ones where staying out is an easy and financially convenient but socially harmful (and eventually brand dilutive) strategy. For Twitter, part of the reason it suffers is that it is so full of noise and fake identities that advertisers can’t monetize it as much. Sharing the below article from the Wall Street Journal.

The Wall Street Journal

Deepa Seetharaman, Jack Nicas and Nathan Olivarez-Giles

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This weekend I watched an HBO special about Fran Lebowitz, Public Speaking, and enjoyed it SO much I want to recommend it.  She is quite a funny and provocative author and thinker.

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Interesting article from the Wall Street Journal: Should We Let Toddlers Play With Saws and Knives?

Should we Let Toddlers Play With Saws and Knives?

By shielding children from every possible risk, we may lead them to react with exaggerated fear. New research on how youngsters learn across different cultures

Last week, I stumbled on a beautiful and moving picture of young children learning. It’s a fragment of a silent 1928 film from the Harold E. Jones Child Study Center in Berkeley, Calif., founded by a pioneer in early childhood education. The children would be in their 90s now. But in that long-distant idyll, in their flapper bobs and old-fashioned smocks, they play (cautiously) with a duck and a rabbit, splash through a paddling pool, dig in a sandbox, sing and squabble.

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My son asked me how many languages there are in the world and, in trying to come up with a cogent answer to him, I came across this fascinating article about languages around the world.  I love how much I learn thanks to my kids’ curiosity.

How many languages are there in the world?

Stephen R. Anderson

The object of inquiry in linguistics is human language, in particular the extent and limits of diversity in the world’s languages. One might suppose, therefore, that linguists would have a clear and reasonably precise notion of how many languages there are in the world. It turns out, however, that there is no such definite count—or at least, no such count that has any status as a scientific finding of modern linguistics.

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In a hair salon in Israel, Arab and Jewish women find common ground… in a sink.

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Back in 2011, when I gave a commencement talk at Trinity University, I spoke about the importance of “talking to yourself” and understanding yourself, of pausing to truly reflect about what gives you meaning.  Of course this is not a revolutionary thought, and many Western thinkers have shared similar concerns in much deeper and more eloquent ways, though I feel the concern has gained critical importance as the internet and electronic devices increasingly inundate our lives and steal away any remaining time for us to connect with ourselves and “do nothing.” Then  a while back (about 2  years ago, but I hadn’t gotten to blog about it, because I have no time to myself!) I came across this very interesting article in The Atlantic, sharing how Eastern/Chinese philosophies had shared similar concerns millennia ago.  It goes to show me/us that all our revelations and lessons have precedent and all interesting thoughts have been had by someone smarter than us in the past.  Part of what I want to adjust in my life is carving out time to be able to read more historical books, to soak up some of that wisdom.

Full article below:

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A must read! In The Power of Broke, Daymond John takes an insightful look at individuals who’ve launched their own powerful brands and careers from a place of desperation, harnessing the “power of broke” to think creatively, alternatively, and aggressively in order to make a meaningful mark.

 

 

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