By Sima Kadmon, columnist at Yedioth Ahronoth

If anyone feels shame, affront, sadness, frustration and despair today—there is no way to ease these feelings. These are our ministers and MKs. This is our prime minister and his bureau staff, who despite how it looks [to the public], pushed and pushed the disgraceful bill that passed last night, with one goal in mind: To preserve Netanyahu’s hold on power.

It was not done secretly, not in the dark; we, the Israeli public, were mugged in broad daylight and in full view. We were robbed of our elementary right to know what public figures are accused of. We have been denied the privilege that every citizen in a democratic country has, to know for whom they are voting.
Despite the cumulative experience that the Israeli public has, we were hard put to believe that this would happen. That our legislature would indeed reach the bottom of the cesspit into which it has fallen, and that such a foul, despicable and anti-democratic bill would be passed into law. [Read more →]

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On Saturday night, Darkeu screened this video to tens of thousands of Israelis, gathered in Rabin Square, who watched in stunned silence. Twenty-two years ago to the day, at that very spot, Yitzhak Rabin was murdered after months of the sort of incitement, hate and violence that is once again rising in Israel. On Saturday, Israel’s moderate majority gathered in the square, united in determination to never again let extremists determine their country’s future.

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Sunday Review, The New York Times
By Adam Grant
Illustration by Aurélie Guillerey

I’m sharing an excellent piece by Adam Grant about the importance of teaching children how to have healthy disagreements, rather than shielding them from any discord. It is a salient point for child rearing, but also for creating a company culture where we prize healthy and hearty debate and learn to listen and think critically. At KIND, we strive to create a culture in which people are comfortable disagreeing with me – and with each other. We know that these debates are never personal, and they often help us arrive on the best solution for the team and company.

When Wilbur and Orville Wright finished their flight at Kitty Hawk, Americans celebrated the brotherly bond. The brothers had grown up playing together, they had been in the newspaper business together, they had built an airplane together. They even said they “thought together.” [Read more →]

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It never crossed my mind that an idea that began to take shape years ago to heal divisions among nations would be as urgently needed to bridge divides within our own country.

Today, I am proud to announce how Empatico will help address the major challenges that our nation and world face in terms of growing alienation, hatred, and the inability to listen to one another.

Fifteen years ago, as I was traveling across the Middle East and the world to build a grassroots Movement to amplify the voice of Israeli and Palestinian moderates, I was struck by a concern shared by everyone with whom I spoke. Each side felt that their people was misunderstood and mischaracterized. Tensions were at an all-time high, but it was clear that each group’s desire was similar: Muslim, Christian or Jew, Arab or Israeli, secular or religious, they wanted to tell their stories and where they were coming from. They wanted to be treated with dignity and respect. [Read more →]

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By Fareed Zakaria, Thursday, Oct. 5, 2017

“He was a sick man, a demented man,” said President Trump, trying to explain the latest mass shooting in the United States. We hear this view expressed routinely, after every new incident. But it is a dodge, a distortion of the facts and a cop-out as to the necessary response.

There is no evidence that the Las Vegas shooter was insane. (I prefer not to use his name and give him publicity, even posthumously.) He did not have a history of mental illness that we know of, nor had he been reported for behavior that would suggest any such condition. He was clearly an evil man, or at least a man who did something truly evil. But evil is not crazy. If we define the attempt to take an innocent human being’s life as madness, then every murderer is mad. If not, we should recognize that it is a meaningless term that adds little to our understanding of the problem.

Actually, the quick assumption of mental illness distorts the discussion. First, it smears people who do have mental disorders. Such people are not inherently highly prone to violence. They are more often victims of violence than perpetrators. And to the extent that some are violent, they are more likely to inflict harm on themselves. Mental-health issues are correlated to suicides far more closely than they are to homicides. [Read more →]

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Weighing a big decision? Here’s what experts say about when to go with your gut or your rational brain—or some combination of both.
By Elizabeth Bernstein

You have an important decision to make. You’ve done research, made a list of the pros and cons, asked friends and family for advice.
When should you just trust your gut?

Scientists, authors and motivational speakers (plus plenty of moms) have long touted the power of intuition—our mind’s ability to understand something without the need for conscious reasoning. Think of all the recommendations you’ve heard: “Put the problem away and come back to it later.” “Intuition doesn’t lie.” “Sleep on it.”

Many studies support this advice, showing that the decisions we make unconsciously, before our rational mind can get involved, are often better. But not always. [Read more →]

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Captain Fantastic

Published under Introspection Oct 02, 2017

My wife and I recently saw Captain Fantastic. I highly recommend it! It was thought provoking — about parenting, modern society, capitalism, and life in general. Strong, powerful, sad, entertaining and very well done. It’s been a long time since I’ve seen such a good movie.

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Heard from Eli Broad at Forbes 400 today. These are the 3 smart questions that he asks himself before deciding whether to fund a project.

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